NetGuide NZ - Samsung agrees to put tablet on hold - Updated

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Samsung agrees to put tablet on hold - Updated

The launch of Samsung’s Galaxy Tab 10.1 tablet in Australasia is in question as a patent dispute threatens to derail proceedings.

In the Australian Federal Court yesterday, Apple Australia accused Samsung of ‘blatant copying’ in the design of the tablet.

"This kind of copying is wrong,” an Apple spokesperson said, "and we need to protect Apple’s intellectual property when companies steal our ideas.”

The court action is ongoing, but Samsung has agreed to stop advertising the tablet, and to delay its release until a legal decision is made.

Samsung New Zealand is refusing to comment on the dispute, although Vodafone told Stuff it expects the tablet’s launch in New Zealand to go ahead in mid-August as planned.

However, in the Australian suit Apple has demanded Samsung stop selling the tablet in other countries, and although it is not specified it seems likely this will include New Zealand.

Another hearing has been set for August 29.

Image source here.

Update: Ausdroid says Samsung's agreement not to sell the Galaxy Tab 10.1 in Australia referred to a different variant of the tablet, and that a different version, designed specifically for the Australian market, will be released in the near future.

The site claims to have received a communication from Samsung that reads, "Apple Inc. filed a complaint with the Federal Court of Australia involving a Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 variant that Samsung Electronics had no plans of selling in Australia.

"No injunction was issued by the court and the parties in the case reached a mutual agreement which stipulates that the variant in question will not be sold in Australia.

"A Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 for the Australian market will be released in the near future."

Update 2: Samsung New Zealand says the legal dispute taking place in Australia will have no impact on local sales, and the Galaxy Tab 10.1 will be released in New Zealand in the near future.

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